so it goes

“We learned in the past, but we are not a result of that. We suffered in the past, loved in the past, cried and laughed in the past, but that’s of no use to the present. The present has its challenges, its good and bad side. We can neither blame nor be grateful to the past for what is happening now. Each new experience of love has nothing whatsoever to do with past experiences. It’s always new.” — Aleph, Paulo Coelho

mjknight11 on goodreads

The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, Dinaw Mengestu:
In my personal opinion, we as Americans tend to forget that this country isn’t just made of people who emmigrated here a hundred years ago and now we’re this big melting pot. It’s also full of people who have immigrated recently, and are still struggling to deal with how to balance being between two worlds. This book does this flawlessly, and I’m not going to lie, in a way that made me cry in public without shame.
Sepha Stephanos is an Ethiopian immigrant who is running from his past, but what he’s running from you don’t learn till much later (it’s so sad…). The story is about his journey to fit in to a country he’s been living in for 17 years without being a part of it, as he slowly drifts away from Ethiopia and his family there.
It’s powerfully written, and I think it’s a powerful story. Africa cannot be neglected in our society any longer. These are just people moving to America because they think they could have a better life for themselves, it’s people who are running from absolutely nothing, devestation and war and famine and disease, hoping that they can do more than just SURVIVE here. Can you imagine? You don’t belong here, you can’t belong there anymore, and here you are. Drifting through hoping to land on something significant. The book does a beautiful job illustrating this.
Throughout the book Sepha and his two best friends play a game where they give a dictator or a specific rebel group and try to identify the country they’re from and the year the rebellion took place. I’ll be honest, I knew maybe a few of the dictators they listed, but I had no idea when or where they were from. How is this possible? Oh wait because we’re Americans, and unless it’s going to affect us (like cut off our trades or hurt us economically) we don’t care. I’m ashamed. Maybe you should be too.

The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears, Dinaw Mengestu:

In my personal opinion, we as Americans tend to forget that this country isn’t just made of people who emmigrated here a hundred years ago and now we’re this big melting pot. It’s also full of people who have immigrated recently, and are still struggling to deal with how to balance being between two worlds. This book does this flawlessly, and I’m not going to lie, in a way that made me cry in public without shame.

Sepha Stephanos is an Ethiopian immigrant who is running from his past, but what he’s running from you don’t learn till much later (it’s so sad…). The story is about his journey to fit in to a country he’s been living in for 17 years without being a part of it, as he slowly drifts away from Ethiopia and his family there.

It’s powerfully written, and I think it’s a powerful story. Africa cannot be neglected in our society any longer. These are just people moving to America because they think they could have a better life for themselves, it’s people who are running from absolutely nothing, devestation and war and famine and disease, hoping that they can do more than just SURVIVE here. Can you imagine? You don’t belong here, you can’t belong there anymore, and here you are. Drifting through hoping to land on something significant. The book does a beautiful job illustrating this.

Throughout the book Sepha and his two best friends play a game where they give a dictator or a specific rebel group and try to identify the country they’re from and the year the rebellion took place. I’ll be honest, I knew maybe a few of the dictators they listed, but I had no idea when or where they were from. How is this possible? Oh wait because we’re Americans, and unless it’s going to affect us (like cut off our trades or hurt us economically) we don’t care. I’m ashamed. Maybe you should be too.

2 notes

  1. readlikebreathing posted this


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